Don’t Click Here!

Why I Never Use “Click Here”

One of the things which annoys me even more than flags for language selection is when a link is marked “click here”.

If you look at the link in isolation and out of context that text means nothing – it gives no clue as to what your click is going to do. You might say it will always be in context, but that can’t be relied on. Screen readers or other assistive devices might be pulling the link out. The link might have become separated from its surrounding text.

The main problem is that not everybody is actually “clicking” any more. So do you put “click or tap here” to cover your touch users? What if you’re using another of the range of wonderful alternative input devices? Does the link become “click or tap here or, speak this, point your eyes, nod your head in this direction or just think out loud”. By being specific you suddenly have to think of every user you might have and every way they might be using your site and on what device.

Cater for Everybody by Targeting Nobody

Why not use the link to describe what is going to happen when you follow it rather than what you have to do to use it? Everybody already knows what to do on their particular device so they don’t need telling. But if you give a clue as to what will happen next you help them decide if it’s worth it.

“Want to see more jobs? Click or tap here!” becomes “See more jobs“.

Click or tap here to continue” becomes “continue“.

As long as the design of the site hints that the link is a link (and this has been happening automatically since day one of the web) you’ll get a better sounding and easier to use link.

Yorkshire Purchasing Organisation

Coverworld Steel Roofing and Cladding

Superfast South Yorkshire

Webasto Thermo and Comfort

The Copacetic Gentleman

Mayfield Motor Company

Mobility House

The Garrison Hotel

Oakworth Homes Timber Housing